ASPECTS OF HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE WORKFORCE IN THE CONTEXT OF LIFELONG LEARNING: A RAPID REVIEW

Authors

  • Evita Grigorovica Rīga Stradiņš University, Medical Education Technology centre
  • Andreta Slavinska Rīga Stradiņš University, Medical Education Technology centre
  • Nora Jansone-Ratinika Rīga Stradiņš University, Director of the Centre for Educational Growth
  • Guntis Bahs <span>Rīga Stradiņš University</span>

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17770/sie2022vol1.6865

Keywords:

healthcare workforce, human capital management, lifelong learning, skills monitoring

Abstract

An individual's knowledge and skills, also known as human capital, shape its professional quality and become a valuable resource for the organization when entering an employment relationship. Investment in human capital, promoting the formal and non-formal lifelong learning of the workforce while implementing targeted capital monitoring, is essential to achieve the strategic goals of the organisation. In addition, in particularly critical areas such as healthcare, human capital management can play a crucial role in ensuring the quality of healthcare and patient safety. The study aims to analyse the research carried out on the aspects of human capital management of the healthcare workforce and its role in the health sector. To achieve the goal, a rapid review was performed by including articles indexed in the databases Scopus and Web of Science in the period 2017-2021, according to search strategy. The study shows - human capital is mostly analysed at the national or regional level as an indicator of a country's level of development (macro-dimension). At the same time, relatively little research has been conducted at the micro-dimension, where management of human capital of the healthcare workforce has been studied at the institutional or sectoral level. Research on human capital management in the healthcare sector at the institutional level only fragmentarily reflects its importance and does not provide a comprehensive picture of effective management methods or systems, as well as benefits or barriers to implementation. There is a significant lack of research on the interaction of human capital management with specific factors in the healthcare sector, such as the quality of health care and the safety of patients and healthcare professionals.

 

Author Biographies

  • Evita Grigorovica, Rīga Stradiņš University, Medical Education Technology centre
    Evita Grigorovica is a development project manager Rīga Stradiņš University (RSU) Medical Education Technology Centre. She leads European Social Fund project “Preparation of digital medical simulation scenarios and development of the teaching staff competence in the use of study material repositories”, Erasmus+ project “Digital and hybrid teaching and learning of practical skills in higher education” and participates in the project “Skills Monitoring System”. She is a resarcher in Erasmus+ project “Sills Tracking System as a Digital Solution for Student-Centred Learning” and has gained experience as a scientific assistant in the project “Life with the Covid-19: Assessment of overcoming the crisis caused by the coronavirus in Latvia and proposals for the stability of society in the future” within the National Research Programme of Latvia “Covid-19 Mitigation”. She also is an assistant of the organising committee of the International Multidisciplinary Research Conference "Society. Health. Welfare" and is working on the publication of the conference proceedings. Currently, she is a doctoral student of RSU study programme “Management science”. The topic of the planned doctoral thesis covers skills monitoring of the health care workforce and improvement of human resource management systems in health care institutions.
  • Andreta Slavinska, Rīga Stradiņš University, Medical Education Technology centre
    Andreta Slavinska is Deputy Director of Rīga Stradiņš University (RSU) Medical Education Technology Centre and Head of the European Social Fund (ESF) project “Skills Monitoring System”. Her main areas of activity include ensuring the integration of simulation-based medical education at the undergraduate, continuing education and professional development levels, as well as the development of research activity in this thematic segment.  She is researcher in the project “Automated hand washing quality control and quality evaluation system with real-time feedback” and also has been working in the project “Integration of safe technologies for protection against Covid-19 in health care and high-risk areas” within the National Research Programme “Covid-19 Mitigation” in the activity “Hand washing quality assessment system”. Currently, she is a doctoral student of RSU study programme “Law”. The topic of the planned doctoral thesis covers the patients' rights to safe health care, medical errors caused by medical practitioners and the necessary skills in their prevention.
  • Nora Jansone-Ratinika, Rīga Stradiņš University, Director of the Centre for Educational Growth
    Dr. paed. Nora Jansone-Ratinika is an associate professor at Rīga Stradiņš University (RSU) and Director of the Centre for Educational Growth. She holds the position of Deputy Chairperson of the Simulation Based Education Council at RSU, is a researcher and an expert in several international projects and a direction supervisor in European Social Fund projects covering specific objectives: reducing fragmentation of study programmes, strengthening sharing of resources and academic staff of HEI, ensuring better governance in HEI. As a leading researcher, N.Jansone-Ratinika has been working in the project “Life with the Covid-19: Assessment of overcoming the crisis caused by the coronavirus in Latvia and proposals for the stability of society in the future” within the National Research Programme of Latvia “Covid-19 Mitigation”, studying the digital competence of the academic staff. Research fields: HE transformations, QA, continuing education of academic staff, student-centred approach, pedagogical innovations in HE.

References

Afiouni, F. (2013). Human capital management: A new name for HRM? International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital, 10(1), 18-34. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/IJLIC.2013.052081

Alolayyan, M. N, Alyahya, M. S., & Omari, D. A. (2021). Strategic human resource management practices and human capital development: The role of employee commitment. Problems and Perspectives in Management, 19(2), 157-169. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21511/ppm.19(2).2021.13

Becker, G. (1993). Human capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Bontis, N., Dragonetti, N. C., Jacobsen, K., & Roos, G. (1999). The knowledge toolbox: a review of tools available to measure and manage intangible resources. European Management Journal, 17(4), 391-402. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0263-2373(99)00019-5

Chatzkel, J. L. (2004). Human capital: the rules of engagement are changing. Lifelong learning in Europe, 9(3), 139-145.

Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group (2020). Interim Guidance from the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group. Retrieved from https://methods.cochrane.org/rapidreviews/sites/methods.cochrane.org.rapidreviews/files/public/uploads/cochrane_rr_-_guidance-23mar2020-v1.pdf

Cohen, R., Gesser-Edelsburg, A., Singhal, A., Benenson, S., & Moses, A. E. (2020). What distinguishes positive deviance (PD) health professionals from their peers and what impact does a PD intervention have on behaviour change: a cross-sectional study of infection control and prevention in three Israeli hospitals. Epidemiology and Infection, 148(e259). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268820002484

Crocker, A., & Eckardt, R. (2013). Multilevel investigation of individual- and unit-level human capital complementarities. Journal of Management, 40(2), 509–30. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206313511862

Currie, J., & MacLeod, W. B. (2017). Diagnosing Expertise: Human Capital, Decision Making, and Performance among Physicians. Journal of Labor Economics, 35(1), 1-43. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/687848

European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP), (2008). Terminology of European education and training policy A selection of 100 key terms. Retrieved from https://www.cedefop.europa.eu/files/4064_en.pdf

European Commission (2016). A New Skills Agenda for Europe. Working together to strengthen human capital, employability and competitiveness. Retrieved from https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52016DC0381

European Commission (2020). European Skills Agenda for sustainable competitiveness, social fairness and resilience. Retrieved from https://ec.europa.eu/social/BlobServlet?docId=22832&langId=en

European Commission (2021). Council Resolution on a new European agenda for adult learning 2021 – 2030”. Retrieved from https://www.consilium.europa.eu/media/53179/st14485-en21.pdf

Garritty, C., Gartlehner, G., Kamel, C., King, V. J., Nussbaumer-Streit, B., Stevens, A., Hamel, C., & Affengruber, L. (2020). Cochrane Rapid Reviews. Interim Guidance from the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group. Retrieved from https://methods.cochrane.org/rapidreviews/sites/methods.cochrane.org.rapidreviews/files/public/uploads/cochrane_rr_-_guidance-23mar2020-v1.pdf

Geerts, I. A. G. M., Bierbooms, J. J. P. A., & Cloudt, S. W. M. G. (2021). Understanding self-managing teams in Dutch healthcare: empirical evidence to non-sequential team development processes. Journal of Health Organization and Management, 35(9), 101-120. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JHOM-04-2020-0122

Halder, N. (2018). Investing in human capital: exploring causes, consequences and solutions to nurses’ dissatisfaction. Journal of Research in Nursing, 23(8), 659-675. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744987118807251

Hamzah, N., Hassan, H., Saleh, N. M., & Kamaluddin. A. (2017). Intellectual capital management practices in Malaysian private hospitals. Asian Journal of Accounting & Governance, 8(SI), 25-35. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17576/AJAG-2017-08SI-03

Huang, H., Leone, D., Caporuscio, A., & Kraus, S. (2021). Managing intellectual capital in healthcare organizations. A conceptual proposal to promote innovation. Journal pf Intellectual Capital, 22(2), 290-310. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JIC-02-2020-0063

Lenik, P. (2018). Inhibitory effect of the environment for the management of human capital of public hospitals in the opinion of Polish managers. 21st International Colloquium on Regional Sciences, 693-698. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5817/CZ.MUNI.P210-8970-2018-91

McMahon, G. T. (2017). The Leadership Case for Investing in Continuing Professional Development. Academic Medicine, 92(8), 1075-1077. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001619

Nalbantian, R., Guzzo, R.A., Kiefffer, D. and Doherty, J. (2004) Play to Strengths: Managing your

Internal Labor Markets for Lasting Competitive Advantage, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.

Nalbantian, R., Guzzo, R.A., Kiefffer, D., & Doherty, J. (2004) Play to Strengths: Managing your Internal Labor Markets for Lasting Competitive Advantage, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.

Nalbantian, H., Guzzo, G., Kieffer, D., & Doherty, J. (2004). Play to Your Strengths: Managing Your Internal Labor Markets for Lasting Competitive Advantage. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2016). Health Policy Studies: Health Workforce Policies in OECD Countries. Right Jobs, Right Skills, Right Places. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264239517-en

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2021). Skills for the future health workforce: Preparing health professionals for people-centered care. OECD Health Working Papers No. 124. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1787/68fb5f08-en

Page, M. J., McKenzie, J. E., Bossuyt, P. M., Boutron, I., Hoffmann, T. C., Mulrow, C. D., et al. (2021). The PRISMA 2020 statement: an updated guideline for reporting systematic reviews. Systematic Reviews, 10(89). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-021-01626-4

Ployhart, R. E., Nyberg, A. J., Reilly, G., & Maltarich, M. A. (2014). Human capital is dead; long live human capital resources! Journal of Management, 40(2), 371–98. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206313512152

Sarto, F., Veronesi, G., & Kirkpatrick, I. (2019). Organizing professionals and their impact on performance: the case of public health doctors in the Italian SSN. Public Management Review, 21(7), 1029-1051. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2018.1544270

Shultz, T. W. (1961). Investment in human capital. The American Review, 51(1), 1-17. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/37839955/Shultz_1961_Investmen_in_Human_capital

Slavinska, A., Grigorovica, E., Palkova, K., Jansone-Ratinika, N., Silis, M., Sabelnikovs, O., & Petersons, A. (2021). Skills monitoring in healthcare studies – for patient safety and healthcare quality. SOCIETY INTEGRATION EDUCATION Proceedings of the International Scientific Conference (1), 611-630. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17770/sie2021vol1.6448

Thomas, H., Smith, R. R., & Diez, F. (2013). Human capital and global business strategy. New York: Cambridge University Press.

World Health Organisation (2016). Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. Retrieved from https://apps.who.int/iris/rest/bitstreams/1060931/retrieve

World Health Organisation (2017). Rapid reviews to strengthen health policy and systems: a practical guide. Retrieved from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/258698/9789241512763-eng.pdf?sequence=1

Downloads

Published

2022-05-19